Tag Archives: adult conversations

Having parenting partners… other than a spouse

I got this great card not long ago.  It was from a mother of another teen boy in our circle.  She noted that she really enjoyed having our family involved with hers and she was glad to have other parents to share this journey with.  She is awesome for creating events for the kids that are age appropriate and I adore her because I. am. worn. right now.  Life’s undertow is catching me and my son is suffering less because of her efforts.  And yesterday I realized that I have parenting partners above and beyond my husband…

Continue reading Having parenting partners… other than a spouse

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Love to all of the mothers of the world…

Earlier in the week, I selfishly dictated to my family that I didn’t want any recognition of Mother’s Day.  It was an expression of pain that I wasn’t able to keep to myself and I am deeply ashamed and remorseful for it.  Especially since my sweet girl has such profound feelings around mommies and such a deep, strange need to have every occasion memorialized.  As far as I have come, I still falter.  And the miracle of motherhood is that my children love me anyway… Continue reading Love to all of the mothers of the world…

How to avoid raising an entitled kid…

Many families in my generation and the next generation down have turned their backs on the way we were raised–when children were to be seen and not heard.  Parenting culture was different.  Expectations were different.  We began to respect these little people and recognize them as humans rather than property.  We gave them more freedom to be children and develop at their own pace.  We allowed them to have a voice.

But some of us didn’t do a stellar job at transitioning them into being respectful and compassionate young adults that could do what they were told WHEN they were told to do it and the WAY they were told to do it.  We quite accidentally created very entitled kids…

Continue reading How to avoid raising an entitled kid…

When you’re homeschooling a six-year-old (and under)

Mamas… So help me homeschooling a 6yo has got to be the worst thing ever.  There aren’t any cool classes available because all of the ones they could do last year were targeted to kids who were MAYBE taking the kindergarten year at home (and they were the upper end of the “age range” for the class.  They’re not yet 7–when some classes open up for the “obviously being homeschooled”/age of compulsory education (in most states).  Kids also go through a cognitive developmental milestone at 7 that changes their understanding of the world (and how they take in information).

But 6… Six just sucked.  So what to do for kids who are 6 (and under)?  Here are the MANY IMPORTANT THINGS you need to teach kids 7 and under (and over, too, if you need to make up for lost time).  And no, it’s not “Don’t do anything!  Just play!”  I assure you–there are things kids need to learn…

Continue reading When you’re homeschooling a six-year-old (and under)

Check in with yourself and see where you want to be

Every day is a new beginning.  I am always motivated in the spring.  Maybe it’s the lengthening hours of sunshine and the starting of my gardens.  Life is bursting forward and I am running face into the wind with all of it.  It’s a good time to check in with yourself and see if you are where you want to be…

Continue reading Check in with yourself and see where you want to be

An eye-opening look at the finances of homeschooling

People always talk about how much it costs to homeschool.  To be honest, it costs about as much as you want it to and/or can afford for it to.  What you don’t pay in dollars you might pay in effort.  The internet and library make for an extraordinarily rich education for the parents willing to exert a few ounces of effort.

BUT…

Continue reading An eye-opening look at the finances of homeschooling

What happens when parenting perspective is not a gift

Recently I was involved in a friend’s Facebook post asking who your MOMMY Inspiration is.  It was an interesting question, probably inspired by Mother’s Day coming up.  I’m actually really proud of my parenting given that I grew up in a home I should have been removed from (my state subsequently underwent federal overhaul of their child protective services division) and another I actually WAS finally removed from (although I was 18 and 2 weeks from graduating when they finally got to it).

What happens when you have kids of your own, start to really understand parenting more, and it DOESN’T give you a greater appreciation for your parents? Continue reading What happens when parenting perspective is not a gift