Tag Archives: socialization

How to avoid raising an entitled kid…

Many families in my generation and the next generation down have turned their backs on the way we were raised–when children were to be seen and not heard.  Parenting culture was different.  Expectations were different.  We began to respect these little people and recognize them as humans rather than property.  We gave them more freedom to be children and develop at their own pace.  We allowed them to have a voice.

But some of us didn’t do a stellar job at transitioning them into being respectful and compassionate young adults that could do what they were told WHEN they were told to do it and the WAY they were told to do it.  We quite accidentally created very entitled kids…

Continue reading How to avoid raising an entitled kid…

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When you’re homeschooling a six-year-old (and under)

Mamas… So help me homeschooling a 6yo has got to be the worst thing ever.  There aren’t any cool classes available because all of the ones they could do last year were targeted to kids who were MAYBE taking the kindergarten year at home (and they were the upper end of the “age range” for the class.  They’re not yet 7–when some classes open up for the “obviously being homeschooled”/age of compulsory education (in most states).  Kids also go through a cognitive developmental milestone at 7 that changes their understanding of the world (and how they take in information).

But 6… Six just sucked.  So what to do for kids who are 6 (and under)?  Here are the MANY IMPORTANT THINGS you need to teach kids 7 and under (and over, too, if you need to make up for lost time).  And no, it’s not “Don’t do anything!  Just play!”  I assure you–there are things kids need to learn…

Continue reading When you’re homeschooling a six-year-old (and under)

Homeschooling children in the autism spectrum and socialization

The Old Schoolhouse was seeking some articles about homeschooling and special needs.  I was fortunate enough to be chosen to write about a subject near and dear to my heart:  how homeschooling children in the autism spectrum can provide wonderful and intensive opportunities for socialization.

This is counter to what many educators will tell parents.  Often, we are told that these children MUST be in school for socialization purposes.  I was told this.  I was told this at least 3 years into intensive therapeutic interventions for my son in the autism spectrum and having a Master’s degree in teaching that included additional graduate level credits in special education and specifically in teaching children with autism.

But I was told that I didn’t know what was best for my son–and that I would be crippling him for life by keeping him home.  In fact, he’s come farther than they anticipated was possible and note that his recent evaluator (who can spot a spectrum child in 2 minutes) was unable to peg his spectrum diagnosis until she was more involved in his testing–where it was unquestionable. She sees kids like mine daily and is involved in many research studies. It comes with new challenges but even she conceded that some of his surprising areas of functionality were undoubtedly the result of the “intensive” or frequency of training he gets at home.

Certainly your family situation, your child’s severity of impairment and your access to services are HUGE factors in this decision.  But for those who have figured out the rest and the final sticking point is socialization… or if socialization has prevented you from even trying to figure out the rest–I invite you to visit my article on this issue at The Old Schoolhouse and let me know what you think.  

Does this raise new thoughts for you?  Concerns?  Challenges?  Awakenings? Opportunities?
Much love to you,

Mama signature orange JPG

Someone asked why we homeschool

On a local forum, a mom asked us to share the reasons we homeschool and she was particularly interested in hearing from parents of kids old enough to be in the public schools.  My post was apparently too long for Facebook… Continue reading Someone asked why we homeschool

“I feel strongly that children need to grow up and function in society.”

This was said to me recently when another parent learned that we homeschool.  How does this idea even still exist?  No, I mean, seriously.  Are people STILL so ignorant that they believe homeschooling a child will render them incapable of functioning in society???

Continue reading “I feel strongly that children need to grow up and function in society.”

No questions asked: kids need structure

If you have a kid that functions better at school than they do at home, this is the phrase that will make you believe not only that you CAN’T homeschool, but that you SHOULDN’T–for your child’s sake (and maybe yours).   I hear this a lot… about how “kids need structure”.  I don’t disagree with the concept although I may have a different perspective on how that manifests in real life.  My son and I do NOT function without structure.  Seriously.  Train wreck.

Structure:  “something arranged in a definite pattern of organization” (thank you, Merriam-Webster online).  So how do you create this when you homeschool?

Continue reading No questions asked: kids need structure

At the intersection of “privilege” and “minority”

This is really not articulating the full breadth of my feelings on this issue.  Not even close.  And probably not as well-connected or easy to follow as I wish.  I’m just going to put it out there and hope someone gives me the benefit of the doubt that my intentions are good and my fear and hurt about this are real and that I am trying to do something good with it all.

Background:  I am white.  I spent several years of my childhood being the only white kid in my neighborhood.  In Kindergarten, I was walked to the school door by the crossing guard because otherwise the black kids chased me and pulled my hair and hit me because I “didn’t belong there”.  We moved, and although the demographics of my school changed, the makeup of my little area of town was still predominantly black.  I was thankfully accepted there and I know this is largely the result of quickly making friends with the tallest (and wisest) black girl there… by way of having the same bicycle and her thinking I stole it.  Thankfully, her bicycle was quickly within view and the crisis averted.  She sheltered me from a lot of nastiness.  Having come from experiencing that nastiness first-hand, I remain grateful 35 years later for her ushering me into being accepted in that community. Continue reading At the intersection of “privilege” and “minority”